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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    S.E. New Mexico
    Posts
    83
    Sorry it took so long to answer. Makes the arc force harder and blows the molten metal off much easier.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    lancaster,ohio
    Posts
    175
    Nothing like finding out I've been doing it wrong lo these many years!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    7,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Cronatron Rep View Post
    http://webapp1.cronatronwelding.com/...temNum=CW01906

    This product has alot less smoke and all you have to do is wire brush it clean after cutting/gouging to prep it for welding. They will work on Mild Steel, Stainless steel, Monel®, Cast Iron and Aluminum. Run them on AC or DC straight around 190 to 200 amps.
    I have used these babies and they are great....the ONLY drawback is that they produce more smoke than CAC...with CAC you get carbon embedding, and your grove should be ground before welding...with these no carbon input, less chance of catching something on fire 50 feet away, like CAC does. and I punched a hole through 2" of steel, just to see if I could....so they're good for making a starter hole in heavy plate....without the blast of air, you need with CAC, the danger situation is minimized. No, I don't work for the company.
    Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
    IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
    IF YOU'RE READING THIS IN ENGLISH, THANK A SOLDIER!

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Smyrna, Georgia
    Posts
    1,112
    Quote Originally Posted by knothead64 View Post
    I sometimes use the welder to cut with because it is so fast.
    I did it today on a piece of 1/8" angle. I used a dampened 3/32" 6011 on DC+ at 85-90 amps and cut right through. Just had a little grinding to do to clean up and wo-la !
    And it only consumed half the rod to complete the cut.
    I made my first cut ever with my Thunderbolt today on some 1/8 angle iron. The 10" rectangular cut I needed to make was going to be a bit awkward to get to with my sawzall and I really don't like cutting with the zip disc on my angle grinder. I knew I would need to grind it smooth anyway.

    So.. I stuck a 1/8" 6010 and a 6013 in a bucket of water. I only let them soak about 5 minutes and gave it a try. The welder was already set on about 110Amps on DC+. The 6013 cut but it was kind of slow and I couldn't seem to hold an arc with the 6010 on DC. So, I said 30 Amp breaker be ****ed, and flipped it to AC and cranked it up to about 200+ Amps. She cut like a champ on AC with both rods and fast. Plenty of fire and smoke and a nice roar (that is the only way I can describe the sound it made) to satisfy me lol. I only set the ground on fire a few times, but nothing my size 10 1/2's couldn't handle.

    The piece that I cut out did look a lot like it was chewed by a beaver, but the hole wasn't that hard to clean up with the grinder. I think if I weren't cutting it freehand, and had marked the lines with a marker, I could have made it a bit prettier. A handy tool when you need it.
    Last edited by smyrna5; 05-22-2008 at 04:15 PM.
    Lincoln 175HD
    Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Smith AW1, Dillon (Henrob) Mark III & Smith Quickbraze Little Torch

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    100
    Don't mean to hijack the thread, but Smyrna which Thunderbolt do you have, was thinking about purchasing one. Let us know if you try cutting with the stick welder again. Very interesting thread.

    10 speed.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Smyrna, Georgia
    Posts
    1,112
    Quote Originally Posted by 10Speed View Post
    Don't mean to hijack the thread, but Smyrna which Thunderbolt do you have, was thinking about purchasing one. Let us know if you try cutting with the stick welder again. Very interesting thread.

    10 speed.
    I have the older model its the 225 AC/DC model in this owners manual. It will do 225 Amps on AC and 150 on DC. Not much to go wrong with these old buzz boxes and you can get parts. They are very cheap on Craigslist.

    http://www.millerwelds.com/om/o316g_mil.pdf

    It looks like this in person, except mine's a little cleaner:

    http://billswelderrepair.com/sitebui...t2-256x384.png
    Last edited by smyrna5; 05-22-2008 at 06:40 PM.
    Lincoln 175HD
    Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Smith AW1, Dillon (Henrob) Mark III & Smith Quickbraze Little Torch

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    1

    Cutting bolt holes intentionally in steel beams

    Quote Originally Posted by Welder-X View Post
    We use OAC for most of our needs in the shop, we break out the plasma for stuff thinner than 1/4". I've only ever used the CAC-A process for back-gouging, washing off backing strips, and the occasional u-groove preparation. I'm not sure if I even wanna try the version without compressed air.
    The CAC-A setup we have going is the afforementioned Arcair where the compressed air jets out from underneath a round, halfround, or rectangular, copper coated carbon electrode. The air jets through the arc, effectively blowing out the molten metal underneath. Jason either means Oxy-arc cutting, or has a setup I've never seen before, but oxy-arc is mainly for underwater and requires a special torch, not to mention, oxygen.
    Now that we're way off topic, cutting with stick: the cheapest way is like Mach4 said, with a 1/8 cellulose based mild steel electrode like a 6010 or 6011, dampened with water. Switch your machine to Electrode Negative and give it arround 95 amps. I've never done this personally, but the electrode should burn really slowly and the extra steam will help blow out the molten. That's a dampened electrode btw, not soaking wet, and the current settings are, of course, just a generalization.
    Works great with 6013 rods with ELECTRODE NEGATIVE mode using 200 Amps with 220V inverter welder.

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