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Thread: Handler 190

  1. #1
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    Handler 190

    Just got a Handler 190 (running on 240v) and I got to say i love it. I have a question about flux -core wire welding capability.
    I have a go-kart frame i need to patch on. By that I mean i have to weld a piece on the seat frame and change the motor mount. Probably 1/8 or possibly 3/16 inch. Can i use the flux core that came with the machine? I have some .025 solid and 75-25 gas from my last welder but havent hooked it up yet. Not a big fan of flux-core.
    Last edited by nonstopgo68; 11-13-2017 at 08:45 AM.

  2. #2
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    Flux core or solid with shield gas, both can do it... Mostly its up to welder and conditions where weld takes place.... Flux core shines with "dirty" metal and in breezy conditions.. Solid wire shines with clean materials and little air movement....So a lot depends on prep of area where weld in going to happen... For me FCAW is dirty splatter, bird poop welds, where solid wire (GMAW) gives me clean welds almost text book looking welds (well ALMOST)... I use ER70S6 with C25 almost exclusive except when I have to revert to bird poop welds.... With MIG its about heat, and wire speed and weave ... You have to dial it up or down depending on what arc is doing and whether you are getting penetration or not...

    Maybe some practice beads on some scrap might give you better idea what option you might want to use...

    But also consider I am hobby welder and not professional, but my welds seem to "stick...

    Dale
    Last edited by Dale M.; 11-13-2017 at 11:39 AM.
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

  3. #3
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    Dale answered as thoroughly as I would have.

    Most of my jobs are done with whatever wire is currently in the gun from the last job where it actually mattered.

  4. #4
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    i appreciate your answers and i will definitely be practicing. i hated my old welder. i really hope it was more the welder and not the weldee or welder or me, whatever.

    im hoping to graduate up to hobbyist level . lol

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonstopgo68 View Post
    i appreciate your answers and i will definitely be practicing. i hated my old welder. i really hope it was more the welder and not the weldee or welder or me, whatever.

    im hoping to graduate up to hobbyist level . lol

    Have 3 pieces of advice..

    1. Practice

    2. Practice

    3. Practice

    Cheers!

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale M. View Post
    Have 3 pieces of advice..

    1. Practice

    2. Practice

    3. Practice

    Cheers!

    Dale
    And, possibly you should take your own advice when it comes to flux core, since you are only using half the capability of your machine. Using flux core, you can make multi-pass welds that are far superior to the best you can make with mig on a small welder, but few develop the skill to do it. This is partly because FCAW resembles stick welding more than mig, and few develop the skill that structural weldors use every day to produce tested welds in critical situations. Here are a couple of examples:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northweldor View Post
    And, possibly you should take your own advice when it comes to flux core, since you are only using half the capability of your machine. Using flux core, you can make multi-pass welds that are far superior to the best you can make with mig on a small welder, but few develop the skill to do it. This is partly because FCAW resembles stick welding more than mig, and few develop the skill that structural weldors use every day to produce tested welds in critical situations. Here are a couple of examples:
    Guess I sort of walked into that one....

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

  8. #8
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    wow thats flux core ?!?!? ok then , i will be trying that out.

  9. #9
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    Right. FCAW isn't just crappy gasless MIG. It's a different process that also happens to be wirefed.

    It needs faster wire speeds and usually more loiter time in the puddle, really watching the fusion and deposition. While MIG is really more complicated than a hot glue gun, the truth is that relatively, well, it's treated more like a hot glue gun and you can sometimes get away with it, even when you don't get the penetration you should if you did it right.

    FCAW often doesn't have a good bead appearance until you also have good penetration.

    The differences are more complicated, but that's just a quick description rolling off my tongue.
    Last edited by MAC702; 11-14-2017 at 10:17 AM.

  10. #10
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    well since northwelder compared it stick welding it kinda put things in a different view. changed my head so to speak. especially those pics. could you give a little more info on the welder and wiresize . im guessing it wasnt .030 to make those beads. and what was meant by half the capability of the machine?
    thanks

  11. #11
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    Found this... Have yet to digest it all.... Find was provoked by northwelders comments.... Got to do a lot more reading on FCAW...

    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...ed-detail.aspx

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonstopgo68 View Post
    ... im guessing it wasnt .030 to make those beads...
    No reason it couldn't be.

    BTW, posts are much easier and faster to read when you use proper punctuation and capitalization. They really are. If you take a few more seconds when typing them, we EACH save several seconds when reading them.

  13. #13
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    The self-shielded fluxcore wire you'd run on a Handler 190 isn't impact rated. Solid wire is impact rated. For welds on a go-kart frame I'd go with solid wire over a 71T-11 or 71T-GS self shielded fluxcore wire.

    Performance wise, the Handler 187/190 is one of the better solid wire, C25 shielding gas MIG units that I've had the opportunity to run. If you get it dialed in correctly, on 1/8", the unit has the potential to produce welds to the quality level shown in my attached picture
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Dan; 11-14-2017 at 02:44 PM.
    MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
    Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


    PM 180C



    HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonstopgo68 View Post
    well since northwelder compared it stick welding it kinda put things in a different view. changed my head so to speak. especially those pics. could you give a little more info on the welder and wiresize . im guessing it wasnt .030 to make those beads. and what was meant by half the capability of the machine?
    thanks
    Miller Lincoln, Bernard, Esab, all have good articles on FCAW, that will help a beginner to fully realize good FCAW ability. There are a few videos that aren't bad, but none have the filters Jodie uses at Welding Tips and Tricks.
    The Lincoln one is about the best, I think.
    What I meant was, that if you get good at flux-core, you can use self shielded and dual shield wire to use all of the capability of your machine, rather than being stuck with the the limited range of jobs and conditions you can work with only using mig capability.
    Also, if some are operating 140 amp (or less) machines on 110 volts, unless they are working on thin material, their use of flux core is going to be very limited.
    Last edited by Northweldor; 11-15-2017 at 08:57 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post

    BTW, posts are much easier and faster to read when you use proper punctuation and capitalization. They really are. If you take a few more seconds when typing them, we EACH save several seconds when reading them.

    OMG ! Have you been talking to my wife? She put you up to this didn't she.
    I will try harder in the future, but I will tell you as I have already told her. I have never taken a typing class in my life.

    What you see is what I have taught myself, ( like.., just about everything else) and I consider my speed and accuracy an accomplishment, not a shortcoming.

    But I digress, Sometimes criticism is what we need to better ourselves, if taken in the right manner.

    i.e. notice the punctuation and capitalization. Speed withheld.
    Last edited by nonstopgo68; 11-15-2017 at 08:45 AM.

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