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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    3

    Miller Synchrowave 250DX Electrical Question

    Hi everyone. I just bought a Miller Synchrowave 250DX. I am ready to hook it up to power and was interested in finding out what type of connection other 250DX owners have done. The manual calls for hardwiring the powersource. I would like to have a plug so I can move the welder out of the way when not in use but the input current can be up to 100 amps.

    Thanks in advance for any advise.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    S.E. Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,084
    Don't think of it as input current.
    Think of it as intake or (current draw).

    That welder will not "draw" anywhere near 100 amps doing typical everyday welding projects.
    It is far more efficient than my Linde UCC 305 which has yet to blow a set of 60 amp slow-blow
    tube-type fuses. Even burning down (2) 3/16" rods in a row.

    A name-brand plug and socket of addequit rating will work fine, in reallity.
    Whether that is to your local code or not is another matter entirely.
    You have to find that out and make your own decissions.
    vg
    ViceGrip

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    583
    Stop by an electrical supply store that caters to the trade. They can tell you what the prevailing electrical code is in your area and what is available. There are plug and socket combinations for things like construction trailers which don't typically get hard-wired. Or wait awhile as there are many electricians on this board that can quote NEMA part numbers. I am an electronics engineer which is NOT an electrician so I would go with their guidance.

    That said, Vicegrip nailed it IMO. I run a welder that is intended for a 50 amp service off of a 10-3 feed which is permitted where I live. If it was a standard service it would be rated for 30 amps. The code treats welding supplies more leniently than the usual service uses. I would put money on it that a NEMA 6-50 plug/socket combo would work just fine and they are stocked at Lowes and Home Depot.
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    Angle grinders, vicegrips, the usual suspects
    Two hands, tired body, not enough time...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    East Virginia
    Posts
    506
    IIRC, I used a 6-50r receptacle and 6-50p plug and 6/3 SOOW cord.

    Note that (in my Sync 250 manual, at least) Miller wants you to use a ground wire from your panel to your receptacle (and from your plug to your welder) at least as large as the conductors used for the two hots.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    5,667
    What size breaker do you plan on using?
    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
    -------------------------
    DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
    Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3
    I was going to hook up a 100 amp breaker connected to a 100 amp disconnect with 100 amp slow blow fuses. And I was going to use no. 6 wire

    And thanks everyone for the feedback so far.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    western KY.
    Posts
    148
    I think all you need is 80amp max..
    .

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    5,667
    Do you need the full 300 Amp output of the welder?
    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
    -------------------------
    DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
    Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3
    I doubt it.... but you never know......

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Brethren, Mi
    Posts
    11,405
    Why the fuses? I would use 6-50 hardware on it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    5,667
    Our Syncro 250 is currently hardwired with #6 (90 C) wire and a 70 Amp breaker.
    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
    -------------------------
    DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
    Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    S.E. Wisconsin
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    5,084
    100 amps seems counter-purposefull (so-to-speak).
    Non industrial welding just ain't gonna pull a hundred amps.

    SO if you do incure some kind of short or meltdown
    100 amps means you incure even worse damage before she POPS
    ViceGrip

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Brethren, Mi
    Posts
    11,405
    SO if you do incure some kind of short or meltdown
    100 amps means you incure even worse damage before she POPS
    The breaker really wont have much to do with this, its probably got its own thermal to protect from over heating and short circuits are in the hundreds of amps. I am going to agree though that it won't likely get burned on wide open, a lot of it would depend on if I had something to fit my panel laying around, as low as 70 or so and as high as 100. A nice thing about this model,,, vs say the 300 is it does allow for a smaller wire, a 6 can be found fairly easily.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15
    So what is a 6 gauge wire rated for in terms of breaker size ?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Brethren, Mi
    Posts
    11,405
    Depends on the machine connected to it,,, and for how long the load is applied, in this case 100A, if it was continuous, depending on wire type,,, or if this was a panel feed as low as 50A.

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