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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Connecticut/Pennsylvania
    Posts
    35

    Syncrowave 200 Wiring

    I'm sure that this has been asked before, but:

    Have the a new Syncrowave 200 in the garage awaiting hook up. I will obviously be running a dedicated circuit to this unit from the 100 amp panel in my garage.

    Owner's Manual states to use a minimum of 8awg wire for a maximum of 147 feet, I will be no where near that length. The manual further states to use a 60 amp time delay fuse - or 80 amp if using a normal operating fuse.

    I would like to use a circuit breaker as opposed to a fuse, so assuming a circuit breaker does not have time delay, I would think to use an 80 amp breaker. However, 80 amps is well above what 8 awg wire is meant to handle. I do not like this because the wiring, ignoring the welder will not be appropriately protected.

    So the plan is to use a 60 amp breaker - BUT will I be limiting the capability of the machine? Since I am running a dedicated circuit I do not want to limit its capability, but 6 awg and an 80 amp breaker seams like overkill.

    Thanks,

    Chris
    Christical

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Browns Valley, CA
    Posts
    8,518
    Chris,

    The manual's recommendations take into account the chart in NEC Art. 630 that allows the conductor size to be derated depending on the duty cycle of the welder.

    In your case, #8 copper on a dedicated crcuit with an 80 amp breaker is all good, and will be code.

    Hank
    ...from the Gadget Garage
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Connecticut/Pennsylvania
    Posts
    35
    Hankj,

    Thanks for the info. Makes sense that the 80 amp breaker would be okay based on the duty cycle and short run of the 8 awg as I will be about 30 feet.

    Of course this leads to a few questions:

    1. Is 80 amp breaker a common size? Home D-p-t has 60, 70 and 100 amp breakers. I don't mind going to a wholesaler to get the breaker, just curious if 80 amp is uncommon.

    2. Will the Syncrowave 200 work to its full potential with a 60 amp breaker? I now know I can use an 80 amp with the 8 awg, but I am thinking if I go sell the house, I would want a 60 amp breaker on that circuit. I could always keep a lower amperage on hand if I sell the house but I would forget what I had it for by then.

    Thanks,

    Chris
    Christical

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    556
    Quote Originally Posted by CHRIStical View Post
    Hankj,
    1. Is 80 amp breaker a common size? Home D-p-t has 60, 70 and 100 amp breakers. I don't mind going to a wholesaler to get the breaker, just curious if 80 amp is uncommon.

    2. Will the Syncrowave 200 work to its full potential with a 60 amp breaker? I now know I can use an 80 amp with the 8 awg, but I am thinking if I go sell the house, I would want a 60 amp breaker on that circuit. I could always keep a lower amperage on hand if I sell the house but I would forget what I had it for by then.

    Thanks,

    Chris
    Not sure if 80 amp is a common breaker size. I remember having to buy an 85 amp Square D breaker from an electrical house and it was around $85 because it was not one of the more common sizes.

    I'd install a 70 amp breaker (around $30 at home depot) and call it good. You can always label the receptacle with, "welder only." If you're not planning on running the syncrowave 200 at full bore all the time, the 60 or 70 amp breaker will be fine. Many guys are running 50-70 amp breakers with their syncrowave 250s.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach Fl.
    Posts
    63

    60 Amp

    I run my Syncowave 200 hard on a 60 amp breaker and have never had any problems.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Brethren, Mi
    Posts
    11,406
    A modern breaker is has a delay, I too would run it on a 60 or even 70 but the 60 is cheap, 15$ or under.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Browns Valley, CA
    Posts
    8,518
    Chris,

    The biggest breaker you could walk away from on #8 copper would be a 55 if it was wired with 90C THHN insulated wire. If it's 75C insulation, then you can only go 50.

    I'd stick a 60 in there. The worst thing that can happen is you take it back and swap it for a bigger one!

    Hank
    ...from the Gadget Garage
    MM 210 w/3035, BWE
    HH 210 w/DP 3035
    TA185TSW
    Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
    Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Connecticut/Pennsylvania
    Posts
    35
    Thanks for the replies, will be going with the 8awg and 60 amp breaker.

    Chris
    Christical

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    13
    I also have a syn 200 that I have used to 150amps on AC for welding aluminum. My wiring is 8str Cu on a 40 amp breaker. To this point in time I have never tripped the breaker. Based on my usage, I would think that a 50amp breaker would easily be sufficient for the syn 200. I know the manual calls for 60 amp.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Sacramento County, California
    Posts
    46

    Sw 200

    I also have a Syncrowave 200. Mine is operating on a 60 amp breaker at the sub panel in my workshop. From the panel, there is a 4 conductor 6 ga. wiring in a conduit to a small box near the welder where I plug it in. The welder cable is, of course, three conductor. I've yet to cause a circuit breaker to open at any amperage setting.

    You should be OK with 8 ga. @ 60 amps.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    502
    Quote Originally Posted by hankj View Post
    Chris,

    The biggest breaker you could walk away from on #8 copper would be a 55 if it was wired with 90C THHN insulated wire. If it's 75C insulation, then you can only go 50.

    I'd stick a 60 in there. The worst thing that can happen is you take it back and swap it for a bigger one!

    Hank
    I don't know how many times this has been covered on here... but National Electrical Code followed in most city's and states, Article 630 deals with wiring and over current protection for electric welders. Depending on the duty cycle of the welder, most are 30 - 50% if that much.For a single welder with a 30% duty cycle take .55 times the rated input amps, that is your amp rating for the conductor needed. I'd put in the 70 amp at least, might also need to consider the amp rating of the terminals on a 70 vs a 60.
    Correction - a 60 amp would be fine, it is a "time delay" over current device and what the manufacturer called for, can't go wrong with that!
    Frankly, I don't know why they list fuses and not circuit breakers.
    Last edited by wmgeorge; 07-24-2008 at 05:30 PM.
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