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psilzle
10-05-2004, 08:35 AM
I have been told that spot welding can be done with a tig welder. I currently have a job where there is a lot of tig and spot welding to be done. There are certin areas that we have to tig, grab the hanging portable spotwelder and get into some pretty tight places to spot about 20 spots. It would be a lot easier to just make an adjustment with out tig welder. The material is .06" to .06" SS.

Does anybody have any experiance with this?

Thank you,

Paul Silzle

Rocky D
10-05-2004, 11:25 AM
The only 'spot' welding I know of would be also called a 'rosette' where there is a hole in the top piece and it is filled with the TIG. But you can you can't get the TIG torch into the area? There are midget torches, and pencil torches, that can get into incredible small areas.

psilzle
10-05-2004, 12:10 PM
Rocky,
Thanks for replying. I know of the plug welding, done that one before. My boss has asked me to look into actual spot welding with a tig. I have found very vague information when I did a search on the net. No holes are cut in either material. I found a article that talks about using a cup to hold the tip off the metal a certian distance and push it against the material and also about having to have the timing down good to stop when you are suppose to. Hoping someone out here has had experience with it.

fatfrank
10-05-2004, 01:08 PM
You sure your not asking about spot welding with a MIG?

psilzle
10-05-2004, 01:19 PM
Not MIG, but TIG. Go to http://www.aws.org/cgi-bin/mwf/topic_show.pl?id=4633 and check that out. It can be done I guess.

Rocky D
10-05-2004, 09:17 PM
It appears that what they are reffering to is a rosette without first drilling a hole. I have done it, what's important is to get the operating amps set first and fire the torch off and count penetrating through the top plate to the bottom without blowing a hole. Must be clamped tight to prevent oxidation for seeping through. Current needs to be applied fast, by mashing down on the pedal quick. Current setting is critical, here so do some tests to get the feel of it.

LarryL
10-05-2004, 11:38 PM
The instruction manual for my TA ProWave 300GTSW has brief instructions on how to perform spot welding. The instructions describe selecting the "Spot" position of the "Spot/Sloper switch," adjusting the "Spot Time Up Control" to the desired spot welding time and adjusting the selected current before doing the actual welding. I have to admit that I've never tried spot welding with my TA welder.

Since my inverter unit has provisions for spot welding, the other brands of inverters and newer welding units probably also have spot welding capability.

Rocky, I'm not sure what the real difference is between the spot welding accomplished by this method with my welder vs. the manual rosette welding technique you described. I would guess that using a timer possibly may result in achieving consistent multiple spot welds once you've found the correct current and time duration.

LarryL

Rocky D
10-05-2004, 11:48 PM
I think it's the same...you have the advantage of a timer.

fatfrank
10-06-2004, 10:50 AM
Rocky, I'm not sure what the real difference is between the spot welding accomplished by this method with my welder vs. the manual rosette welding technique you described. I would guess that using a timer possibly may result in achieving connsistent multiple spot welds once you've found the correct current and time duration.

LarryL

Maybe you are also saving time by not having to drill holes for the rosette?