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BRITTON987
06-19-2004, 07:48 AM
i wanted to know if it is safe to touch the metal while welding on it. can anyone help?

gnewby
06-19-2004, 07:51 AM
Even with gloves on you could suffer some bad burns from doing so. I might hold a part together long enough to tack it in place but to weld it, I see no reason to hold onto it. Don't really like the burns to my fingers.

fatfrank
06-19-2004, 09:47 AM
Are you worried about being shocked? If that is the question, don't worry too much about it so long as your not standing in a mud puddle welding with the ground clamp hooked to your earlobe ;) .

I would bet you will figure out on your own about the metal getting hot and not holding on real close to where your welding.

BRITTON987
06-19-2004, 10:41 AM
thanks alot. but i mean to tell me i cant stand in a puddle of mud and clamp the ground to my ear??? i guess ill have to find a new way to weld :-D

SuperchargedS10
06-19-2004, 10:41 AM
electrical shock = not an issue under normal conditions.
heat burns = thats possible

BRITTON987
06-19-2004, 10:44 AM
i didnt know you can get burned :-D.. just being a smart ***. thanks for the reply

AV8OR
06-19-2004, 08:23 PM
They weld big ships and other things all the time while touching the metal. You can do headstands while welding just don't get between the arc.

If you do have to weld where you are standing in wet grass or mud get an old fork lift pallet and stand on that.

supergper
06-19-2004, 09:24 PM
Even if you are standing in a puddle you will just feel a little annoying tickle:D...I used to weld on big fishing boats all day and yes, you are often touching the metal that is being welded to. If you are sweety then you will feel a little shock sometimes, but 9 out of 10 times you wont even know you are touching it...of course besides if you get burnt:D

Taco
06-19-2004, 10:23 PM
I don't think the risk of being shocked is that big of one. I hold onto parts being welded all the time with my hands in leather gloves.


I have only been shocked welding once. That was tig welding with goat skin tig gloves. Don't remember if I was using ac or dc at the time or what the circumstances that might have caused that zap. It wasn't a big shock but it was enough to get my attention.

davesisk
06-19-2004, 10:52 PM
Guys...under the right circumstances, less than 1 amp can cause cardiac arrest. I don't think I want any 100-200 amp "tickles" myself. So far, I haven't had any, and I'm trying to keep it that way.

Use insulated gloves, make sure you don't have any bare still touching the metal, etc. It's ok to hold the pieces while you tack them together if you have insulated gloves on...unless there's something odd, like you're standing in water, you've sweated so much the gloves and your t-shirt touching the work-clamp are soaked, etc. Make sure you have the work clamp connected and it's a good connection. Every one forgets that from time to time...I started hooking mine to the work table so I don't have to remember to hook it back up after I move the part around...

HTH,
Dave

asad
06-19-2004, 11:46 PM
Originally posted by davesisk
Guys...under the right circumstances, less than 1 amp can cause cardiac arrest.

Actually it's under 10 milliamps if the current flows across your heart (say, arm to arm).

You need a lot of voltage to overcome the resistance of dry skin...but if it's wet or sweaty.......:eek:

Asad

rjt70
06-20-2004, 04:22 AM
OK, say your welding inside of a frame like table project. And the machine is out of your reach and you hang your stinger with an electrode intact over the framework. Now if the tip of the electrode happens to swing and contact, say your arm while you are holding onto the frame that has the ground clamp on it, then yes, you will be shocked! It ruined my day! Am I the exception to the dumbass rule? No, but I'll admit to being a dumbass so maybe someone can learn from my experience, it could have been fatal.

SND
06-20-2004, 11:50 AM
A guy told me his brother got his watch permanently tattoed into his wrist while welding under a car or something. I guess the arc went thru the watch and got red hot.

Once when tig welding the arc went thru the filler rod and down my arm and into the table, but I was taking my foot of the pedal at the same time, so it was just a quick tickle.

Just gotta watch where you point the electrode. I also never leave an electrode in the holder when I put it down. I prefer not to take any chances.

trashcan
06-20-2004, 06:03 PM
welding on a gate one day with the crappy stinger that came with my lincoln tombstone and the wire came out of the stinger. needless to say I squated down, inadvertantly placed my knee on the exposed wire and when I touched the rod to the gate it lit me up like a Christmas tree!!!! New stinger ordered the next day and problem solved. Haven't had a shock like that since my wise *** dad talked me into holding a spark plug to my 78 TT500 while he kicked it over.....shocking!!!
Thump On!!

BRITTON987
06-20-2004, 06:26 PM
thanks for all the info guys. i guess ill stick to wearing gloves all the time:D

drizler
06-21-2004, 01:09 PM
But I did sucker a couple of my friends into it. My best was conning someone into peeing on a weedcutter electric fence. Like they say " A Little Song, A Little Dance And A Good Time Was Had By All"; most of us anyways.

Thomas Harris
06-21-2004, 05:39 PM
Originally posted by SND
A guy told me his brother got his watch permanently tattoed into his wrist while welding under a car or something. I guess the arc went thru the watch and got red hot.

Once when tig welding the arc went thru the filler rod and down my arm and into the table, but I was taking my foot of the pedal at the same time, so it was just a quick tickle.

Just gotta watch where you point the electrode. I also never leave an electrode in the holder when I put it down. I prefer not to take any chances.

I have been married 22 years and it's been a long time since I wore that wedding band. The habit started when working around machines and just spread to other times. I won't wear any jewelry of any kind, (that includes watches), while doing any work involving machinery or climbing. I believe there was in nice picture of the classic "welded" wedding band someone achieved as they touched wrench to ground and ring to positive, then the two connected. Twelve volts can produce a nice arc with the near unlimited amperage of fully charged battery.

Tankee
06-21-2004, 08:38 PM
I prefer gloves no matter what even though I know getting bit under normal welding conditions is rare. I have however been nailed several times while working on tank bottoms in the refineries. Wet gloves + 225 plus amps + steel deck will suck you to the floor and curl you into a little ball really quick. I guess you could say I am a bit leary and leave nothing to chance.

James D. Clark
06-21-2004, 08:39 PM
Where I worked, all rings, watches, jewelry-nothing was permitted on the hands or arms by anybody working in the factory and labs. Everybody wore safety glasses with side shields. No exceptions! All things like those that could catch in a machine or catch while working were forbidden. Snagging a ring or watch could cost you your hands or fingers. Shorting a ring or watch could cause electricution or a bad burn.

Shorting a ring when working on a vehicle will cook the finger to the bone and require amputation. :( Jumping off a truck, tractor, ladder or wagon and catching the ring will remove the finger PDQ:eek: I've heard of both.

And don't even think of grabbing a modern sparkplug wire or using it as a practical joke. Vehicles today aren't model T's. High energy ignition systems discharge somewhere around 50,000-60,000 volts and are lethal-will kill. I think that's why you can't even find the sparkplugs on some vehicles anymore.:D :(

rjt70
06-22-2004, 01:19 AM
Not power related but jewelery related. When I was in tech school for small engines many eons ago I witnessed a young feller raise an overhead door on the shop by hand, and get his ring caught in the pull handle. Lifted him several feet before the ring peeled his finger like a bananna and he dropped to the ground. He didn't lose it, (but I almost did) but it was pretty traumatic, not to mention gross!

Ben
06-22-2004, 12:49 PM
I have long-arcd into my filler rod and have taken some amps through my arm. Put it this way, you will let off of the pedal quickly when you light yourself up. I have also got myself when I had a good sweat going through my sleeves and long arcd. Speaking of getting burned ... I just noticed a nice sunburn where my sleeves were not pulled over my shirt sleeves yesterday - I won't make that mistake again. Ouch!

mrimpact
06-22-2004, 11:10 PM
I have gotten shocked many times when welding on vehicle frames when using stick welding.

It's not the flux coating on rod when touched that will get me shocked it's when my hand comes in contact with the electrode itself like if my hand touches the very bottom of the rod before I am welding.I hardly wear gloves because they are too clumsy but when I am using gloves they are usually very light gloves such as tig gloves.

Believe it or not they actually work better than the big leather ones.As far as "touching the metal" that's being welding It won't do nothing for me even when not wearing gloves but I just don't want to get too close to the weld arc
;)

James D. Clark
06-22-2004, 11:27 PM
Originally posted by mrimpact
I have gotten shocked many times when welding on vehicle frames when using stick welding.

I hardly wear gloves because they are too clumsy but --------------- but I just don't want to get too close to the weld arc
;)

You don't wear gloves while welding?:( :eek:

mrimpact
06-22-2004, 11:41 PM
correct but when i use 3/32 6011 it can get pretty bad so i use lighter gloves.I rarely get burnt even without gloves but you can still feel the sparks but it's not so bad till where you #$&% your pants.I only wear the lighter gloves with protective jacket when i'm overhead welding but other than that it's really not an issue.You know you just have to take it as a Man(Welder) not a wuss

forgot.if i was a heavy industrial equipment machine shop welder or an all day structural building welder that would weld all day then i would most likely be wearing gloves and some other protective fatigues:rolleyes:

James D. Clark
06-23-2004, 10:24 AM
My concern wasn't with the sparks. If you aren't bothered by them that's ok by me. Just wonder about the exposure to the rays from the arc and the accumulative effect to your hide. Just a thought from one that has another appointment with the skin doctor.:D ;)