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ross932c
05-14-2004, 10:19 PM
My neighbour has a 4 wheeler tha the uses to pull wagans around with and the hithc that came pre attached was kind of short, and when turning corners the wagons hit the tires and it was kind of to low to the ground. So he asked my to make him up a new one. HE pulls grain wagons, trailers and alot of heavy stuff, I'm not a pro welder but I'm better then they are so I was going to make him one but don't know if this is something I will be able to make. I will use a 235 Amp stick welder.

I am pretty confident in my welding abilities wo that isnt much of a problem, I was just wondering what size of steel, type ans sive and what I should use for this hitch. What is usually for hitches?

Thnanks.

highnoon
05-15-2004, 12:47 AM
I added a hitch to a atv that did'nt even offer one as an option.
You have the advantage that at least you have a hitch to build from. Some of the things you need to consider is the weight that will be pulled and tongue weight. If you extend the hitch it will add more leverage and could break the rear end housing. On the job I did this was a concern so I ran support rods from the new hitch to points on the atv where the rear rack mounted. That puts the tongue weight further back on the atv and gets the pressure off of the axle mount. By doing this you can also raise the ball height to the height you need. If you raise the ball height to much you may consider running support rods forward as well to a good anchor point.

Sandy
05-15-2004, 01:02 AM
Originally posted by highnoon
.............That puts the tongue weight further back on the atv and gets the pressure off of the axle mount. By doing this you can also raise the ball height to the height you need. If you raise the ball height to much you may consider running support rods forward as well to a good anchor point.

Please be careful guys. Quads are similar to tractors in the respect that they have tremendous traction at times. Higher hitch heights generally equate to "over backwards". Keep those hitches as low as practicable. Try not to get any higher than necessary.

The short hitches are sort of a balance between recreational boony bouncing and towing a trailer. How about if you wanna do both devize some sort of removable or insert affair and still keep the towing low centered? Don't know what that would be but it sounds good.

highnoon
05-15-2004, 01:12 AM
Very true you should always keep the loads to a managable weight if the hitch goes up the weight of the load goes down. There is a lot to consider just did'nt want to write a book about the subject. But thank you for bringing up the safety issue it is one subject I should of included. Liability is a nasty thing to have to deal with.

James D. Clark
05-15-2004, 01:26 AM
Can you take a picture of the original hitch setup and post it? As already said, the old hitch was probably low to the ground for a reason-anti-wheely. The old hitch couldn't have an extension added? Same thickness and width? Is the 4 wheeler just to spot wagons, etc. or used for travel. Hope it isn't the tail wagging the dog where the load takes control.:(

jeffscarstrucks
05-15-2004, 09:17 AM
You might consider a 1 inch slide in receiver type tube that you could attatch to the existing structure. It could look like a factory installation and you could use any number of different hitch configurations for whatever the tow of the day is. Most RV suppliers carry the pieces to do this. Good luck and let us know (see) how it goes. JEFF

Terry Lingle
05-15-2004, 11:11 AM
As long as the center line through both axles is above the ball centerline it can't lift the front end. There was a post here or on the other place for a nice receiver hitch about a month ago do a search on it . I would second the slide in design just make it large enough that the long insert wont bend.
I just built a front hitch for my suburban. it has a 2" body lift on it so I had space above the bumper.Note that it is way above the centerline but it is for a different purpose. I copied a Reese and built custom attach plates. Because I want to use it with standard slide ins I salvaged the reciever tube from a older light duty hitch. I only built this because it is a custom space design.
here is the first pix. The main use for this is as a front attach for my 10,000 lb winch. It will only be used from the front if it is impossible to rig from the rear. Terry

Terry Lingle
05-15-2004, 11:26 AM
The end plated are t-1 steel and are drilled and tapped. I used all the possible holes for strength . When installed these bolts also hold the front bumper in place .

Here is a shot of it in place for tacking up
There are hidden 1/32 spacers between the side plates for clearance after welding. When welding was complete it dropped on and the spacers still fit in .
Terry

Sandy
05-15-2004, 12:49 PM
There is a lot to consider just did'nt want to write a book about the subject. But thank you for bringing up the safety issue it is one subject I should of included. Liability is a nasty thing to have to deal with.
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Highnoon,
I should have known you had the liability thing covered. Too bad you can't just do little things for people without considering the bottom feeders lurking in the background.

Actually, when it comes to personal safety and welfare issues, I'm about as careless as you can get. Heck I've rolled or flipped my quad at least four times that I can think of real easy. Once with the trailer on. Neither the hitch or tongue has fully recovered from that one. Torch, cheater bar and sledge hammer time.

ross932c
05-15-2004, 10:07 PM
You guys are great. The hitch that is on the 4 wheeler now is bolted on. I was going to unbolt it and make a new plate that lines up with the bolt holes. I will get a pictures as soon as possible. The digital Camera is at my dads shop right now. I'll get him to pick it up this week. Thanks. What is a standard hole size for a hitch?

Terry Lingle
05-15-2004, 10:51 PM
standard truck hitches are 2 inch square so the tubing that you need is a special made for hitches tube and is quite hard to find. there is a light duty hitch series but I think they are also 2 ". Go to the bone yard and locate a hitch on a small car and salvage it . that way you can use off the shelf slide in parts.
I looked in my steel manual and the closest that you can get is 2.5X 2.5 X .188 wall leaving the pin quite loose. Terry

WelderGuy24
05-15-2004, 11:28 PM
Originally posted by jeffscarstrucks
You might consider a 1 inch slide in receiver type tube that you could attatch to the existing structure. It could look like a factory installation and you could use any number of different hitch configurations for whatever the tow of the day is. Most RV suppliers carry the pieces to do this. Good luck and let us know (see) how it goes. JEFF

what he said, it would look really professional

ross932c
05-16-2004, 10:11 AM
This is a hitch for the same 4 wheeler that someone else made. Tell meif you think this will work. The 2" tubing is the tubing that he added on, the hitch that is already there is the little thing it is bolted to.

ross932c
05-16-2004, 10:14 AM
I also might just make completely new plates that bolt to the prexsisting holes. Would 1/4 steel plate be strone enough?


HE doesn't do any long hauls with the 4 wheeler, just wagons back and forth to fields, trips to theneighbours, things like thta,but he pulls soem serious weight sometimes, like a grain wagon fully loaded.

Terry Lingle
05-16-2004, 10:43 AM
Look at what you are attaching to on the 4 wheeler. If what you are attaching is stronger than that part of the 4 wheeler your hitch will not fail. If you make it 10 times stronger nothing gets better.
Concidering the loads he wants to move I would use a 2 inch tube I would also make it just long enough to provide the clearance needed. I would do this to minimize the lever length that you are creating to keep it from twisting the 4 wheeler frame .
Terry

Sandy
05-16-2004, 02:28 PM
Look at what you are attaching to on the 4 wheeler. If what you are attaching is stronger than that part of the 4 wheeler your hitch will not fail. If you make it 10 times stronger nothing gets better.
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Terry's right. Take a good look at what you're mating to. Depending on the rear-end type and method of attachment you may be bolting up to nothing more than some little aluminum ears. Looking around at a lot of manufacturers installations you notice sort of built in weak points or "points of failure". Or they post load bearing/strength rating stickers, LOL. But the point is, you may want something to give or bend before you shove the damage in to the big ticket items.

To make things simple maybe just a casual discussion with the guy when you're done. "This is pretty strong so you'll have to watch that" sort of conversation.