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usmcpop
02-22-2008, 05:46 PM
It has probably been discussed here before, but I ran across a discussion of the terms on another forum. I researched a wee bit, and discovered several references to "welder" as a person dating from 1898 to the late 1920's. No mention of "weldor" as the person doing the welding. Hmmm...

Rocky D
02-22-2008, 06:06 PM
It has probably been discussed here before, but I ran across a discussion of the terms on another forum. I researched a wee bit, and discovered several references to "welder" as a person dating from 1898 to the late 1920's. No mention of "weldor" as the person doing the welding. Hmmm...

Contrer mon frer it has been discussed several years ago...there are a few dictionaries that recognize "weldor", and I think AWS does , too now.

dbl_0
02-22-2008, 06:07 PM
It has probably been discussed here before, but I ran across a discussion of the terms on another forum. I researched a wee bit, and discovered several references to "welder" as a person dating from 1898 to the late 1920's. No mention of "weldor" as the person doing the welding. Hmmm...

Lincoln's 'Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding' calls the person doing the welding as a 'weldor' and that's what I was taught .... but that was 'back in the day'. :)

Broccoli1
02-22-2008, 06:20 PM
Technically it is Welder

"or" would be for for when base words ends in "ate"

So Weld is Welder

Create is Creator

A Lincoln welder is not a machine but rather a President that did some welding:D

....but for practical purposes on Forums, "Welder" is used to describe the Machine and "Weldor" is the person operating the machine.

usmcpop
02-22-2008, 06:34 PM
I guess I'll have to cite sources, etc., and let you all judge. I'm talking about actual full-text welding books and technical encyclopedias from these ages. My suspicion is that "weldor" may have come about AFTER the advent of electric welding when they finally had a "welder", or was perhaps an English term or just a misspelling. Before that, welders had only torches, forges and perhaps thermite to make a weld. I think the "electric welding apparatus" or whatever may have been shortened to "welder", and that the "weldor" spelling could have been coined at that time.

Anyone have any historical references to "weldor"?

scapegoat
02-22-2008, 06:40 PM
I will have to say that a "weldor" is a person and a "welder" is a machine.

thingy
02-22-2008, 06:45 PM
This is a good example of why I never learned how to spell very well,,thingy

dbl_0
02-22-2008, 06:55 PM
Yeah, well I've done a lot of welding with my welder but it never made me feel quite like this:

The Weldor's Weld
by Sonia Balcer 8/21/82

Wherefore must I wear a mask when
I hold in my hand, the pen
wherewith I write poetry with fire?

How I long to discover the secrets that are hidden
in the theater before me;
to behold the movement of tiny, metal
particles, as they waltz and interlock
in a world within a world;
as they pirouette between the boundaries set
by the fire which frees them to move.

Oh, Lord in heaven! Why are not human eyes made
to see this wonder directly?
Must I always hold this dark glass before me?

Hark! He causes my heart, to see the mystery!
The metals are assaulted, by electric energy,
carried by heaving, heavy wires. In a molten flash,
I see the crystals breaking, and sighing;
the silent order of the solid surface, giving way
to rushing, hotly-radiant tides
that crash together like waves at a beach.

It swirls before me, an intricate dance
which I cannot see, but yet feel inside.

I delight to caress the molten piece
in my heart.
It is inside of me, and I am inside of it.
I slowly feel over and underneath
the hot liquid surfaces.
I move into its every contour, and through
the whole of it.

Bodies of metal, which once were separate;
the boundaries are fading.
It swirls and whirlpools within me-
It is all blurred now, caught
Into a quickly-freezing body of what once
was separate, but now is together,

a single piece.

Ahhh ..... to be a weldor welding with my welder :D

Rocky D
02-22-2008, 06:56 PM
I will have to say that a "weldor" is a person and a "welder" is a machine.
Especially on this forum, where the two would be used in the same sentence. Avoids confusion.

Rocky D
02-22-2008, 07:06 PM
Yeah, well I've done a lot of welding with my welder but it never made me feel quite like this:

The Weldor's Weld
by Sonia Balcer 8/21/82

Wherefore must I wear a mask when
I hold in my hand, the pen
wherewith I write poetry with fire?

How I long to discover the secrets that are hidden
in the theater before me;
to behold the movement of tiny, metal
particles, as they waltz and interlock
in a world within a world;
as they pirouette between the boundaries set
by the fire which frees them to move.

Oh, Lord in heaven! Why are not human eyes made
to see this wonder directly?
Must I always hold this dark glass before me?

Hark! He causes my heart, to see the mystery!
The metals are assaulted, by electric energy,
carried by heaving, heavy wires. In a molten flash,
I see the crystals breaking, and sighing;
the silent order of the solid surface, giving way
to rushing, hotly-radiant tides
that crash together like waves at a beach.

It swirls before me, an intricate dance
which I cannot see, but yet feel inside.

I delight to caress the molten piece
in my heart.
It is inside of me, and I am inside of it.
I slowly feel over and underneath
the hot liquid surfaces.
I move into its every contour, and through
the whole of it.

Bodies of metal, which once were separate;
the boundaries are fading.
It swirls and whirlpools within me-
It is all blurred now, caught
Into a quickly-freezing body of what once
was separate, but now is together,

a single piece.

Ahhh ..... to be a weldor welding with my welder :D

It don't rhyme...what's up with that?

usmcpop
02-22-2008, 07:41 PM
The Welder's Weld

Dzzzt. Dzzzt. Dzzzt, Dzzzt, Dzzzt.

Dzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzztttt. Dzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzztttt. Bang, bang, bang, chip, chip.

You owe me $50.

------------------------------

It's Haiku - doesn't need to rhyme.

dbl_0
02-22-2008, 08:37 PM
Especially on this forum, where the two would be used in the same sentence. Avoids confusion.

Yep, I agree. As for the 'The Weldor's Weld' and not being a rhyme, well ..... I'm wondering what she was smoking while she wrote it ..... 10-4 :confused:

Broccoli1
02-22-2008, 08:43 PM
Yep, I agree. As for the 'The Weldor's Weld' and not being a rhyme, well ..... I'm wondering what she was smoking while she wrote it ..... 10-4 :confused:

Metal Fume Fever:D

ace4059
02-23-2008, 02:08 AM
The Welder's Weld

Dzzzt. Dzzzt. Dzzzt, Dzzzt, Dzzzt.

Dzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzztttt. Dzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzztttt. Bang, bang, bang, chip, chip.

You owe me $50.



thats pretty funny. :D

-Ryan

Jonesy70
02-23-2008, 08:55 AM
Ive seen Belt buckles that have read both...I've always called the man (or woman)a welder aswell as the machine. Weldor wasn't a registered word on my spell check!:D

enlpck
02-23-2008, 09:38 AM
(Lack of sleep and the flu have put me in a strange mode, so lets look at the language a bit. I really don't care about the 'which is correct' argument, but thought I'd throw a few points out)

The proper name for the machine is a "welding machine" or a "welding source" or a "power source" or....

The person doing the job is a welder.

The 'OR' ending started showing, as far as I can find, in the late 1960's or early 1970's in some of the Lincoln literature and a few other places.

Analogy: When someone writes (welds), they are a writer (welder), and they use a pencil (welding machine) in performing the task.

When someone drives, they are the driver. They drive a car (or truck, or..)

English is not French. There is no committee that legislates the language. It is a living, growing language. At this point, 'weldor' seems to have taken some hold. Is it *correct*? Time will tell. Time will tell.

Now I wait for a bunch of people to give examples that contradict mine. Then I will have learned something.

moe1942
02-23-2008, 10:15 AM
The conventionally accepted spelling and pronunciation rules. I think weldor is now universally accepted..

Just like no one pronounces err as it should be. Everyone pronounces it air.

The Queens english is dead. Long live the king...

joatmon
02-23-2008, 11:07 AM
I still like the poem.....paints an intricate mental picture.... better than just fusing two metal pieces.

JimDon
02-23-2008, 11:23 AM
No matter what the spell check, it's a joke, so if you're surprised weldor isn't in your spell check, don't be. All you have to do is consider: to, too, and two and then see how well spell check handles this minor conundrum. If you want to get technical, in the writing and English (as in teaching it) world, Webster's is usually considered the tie breaker -- so, I looked it up in webster's Ninth, C 1988. They list "Welder" as "one that welds. Now they have the second def. of "or weldor: one whose work is welding." with the third def. as "a machine used in welding." Soooo, if you want to use welder or weldor as for the person welding, it would be CORRECT. Only welder, would be the machine, as has been stated by virtually everybody responding to this thread.
Jim Don

Broccoli1
02-23-2008, 12:59 PM
No matter what the spell check, it's a joke, so if you're surprised weldor isn't in your spell check, don't be. All you have to do is consider: to, too, and two and then see how well spell check handles this minor conundrum.
Jim Don

That's because if you use any of those they are spelled correctly:) It doesn't check for grammar

Same for there, their & they're

usmcpop
02-23-2008, 06:28 PM
I did find a couple early references to "weldor" in books, one from 1911 and one from 1928.

TOMWELDS2
02-23-2008, 10:07 PM
So i ran this question by a friend, the other day (at his welding shop)...his reply, "are you here to buy something"? So much for that!

Pumpkinhead
02-24-2008, 09:48 AM
Just like no one pronounces err as it should be. Everyone pronounces it air.

as it should be.

usmcpop
02-24-2008, 09:59 AM
So i ran this question by a friend, the other day (at his welding shop)...his reply, "are you here to buy something"? So much for that!

In his case, it's spelled "businessman". :D

lars66
02-24-2008, 11:52 AM
The Hobart Welding News magazines from proably the middle 50's to early 60's refer to the person doing the welding as weldors.

Some Creep
02-24-2008, 01:23 PM
"welder"........"weldor".......


I dunno, I never was any good at math.....

:D

Broccoli1
02-24-2008, 01:27 PM
"welder"........"weldor".......


I dunno, I never was any good at math.....

:D

You get my e-mail?

ed@screamingbroccoli.net

via Hobart

Some Creep
02-24-2008, 01:34 PM
You get my e-mail?

ed@screamingbroccoli.net

via Hobart


Yes, I sure did! I'm at my home PC at the moment and am registering right now! TY for the info, hope to see you there!