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View Full Version : How to wire extension cord to go from welder to generator?



cybordolphin
02-15-2007, 03:12 AM
I want to run my H 187 welder from my generator.

Does anyone know how to wire in the connectors? I plan on using 8/3 wire. But I forsee a problem. The welder takes a 3 conductor wire. However the generator has a 4 wire inlet.

The inlet on the extension cord will have to be a 6-50r. The plug on the extension cord will have to be a L14-30 though to plug into the generator.

How do I go from a 4 conductor inlet on the generator to the 3 conductor wire to the generator?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Sberry
02-15-2007, 07:49 AM
You do not use the neutral wire, 2 hots and the ground.

cybordolphin
02-16-2007, 01:33 PM
Thanks... that is what I was thinking. It looks like I am just going to buy 8/4 and drop the neutral. ****.... wire is awful expensive these days! What's up with THAT?

Dodgepu360
02-16-2007, 04:01 PM
I am not an electrician but why not just use a 3 conductor wire and leave the pin for the 4th wire on the 6-50p disconnected?

as opposed to have one wire in the cord that is not conected to anything on one end

Sberry
02-16-2007, 04:04 PM
You can do that, 3 wire will work, he could conceivably use the 4 wire at some future point for a house feed if needed.

hankj
02-16-2007, 04:19 PM
I am not an electrician but why not just use a 3 conductor wire and leave the pin for the 4th wire on the 6-50p disconnected?



There is no "fourth" pin on a 6-50R or P. Just 3. Two hot. One ground.

3-wire cable is all that's needed for the generator to welder connection.

Hank

Dodgepu360
02-16-2007, 06:21 PM
does the L14-30 have 4 pins?

Sberry
02-16-2007, 07:13 PM
Si,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

hankj
02-16-2007, 10:42 PM
does the L14-30 have 4 pins?

Yup. The NEMA 14-30 configuration is called "3-wire grounding", which mean it lands an equipment ground (green), a neutral, and two hots.

In older generators, neutral and ground were bonded on the generator, but the new versions have a "floating" neutral. No bond. That's important to remember if you want to use your generator for emergency power to your house! Make sure to take the two hots and the neutral! If you don't, there will be no neutral reference for your 120V circuits, and much stuff will let the smoke out.

It would be kind of you not to ask how I know this......:o

Hank

cybordolphin
02-17-2007, 12:19 AM
Yep.... I am likely just going to go 8/4, as mentioned I can always find a use for the cord later on if need be. It should work out to be the same cost if I buy in bulk. I need 250 ft of cord (for my generator to transfer switch, welder to genertator, and welder to house current).

Still trying to find 8/4 (600 volt), for less than $2.28 per foot though.

The 14-30 inlet is wired 4 wire. The 6-50 is inlet is only wired with 3 wires as noted above. Thus my original question as to how to wire them together. Dropping the 4th wire (neutral) on the cord will be the solution.

When going generator to household current (into my manual transfer switch), I will heed the advice above and be sure to wire in the neutral!

diveclint
02-17-2007, 08:25 AM
I bought a 100' 10/2 (w/gnd) extension cord from Lowes. Chopped the ends and rewired with NEMA plugs. Been using it for about a year now with no negative effects.

Also, I went to my local ACE Hdwe and bought a household Dryer cord (4') AND a household Oven/Range prefab cord (also 4'). I cut the soldered connector rings off and hardwired NEMA plugs to both.....no matter what, if I show up at someone's house to do some work for them, there's always a plug that will work. :D

diveclint
02-17-2007, 08:28 AM
I suppose one of these days I'm gonna break down and buy a ****** engine-driven welder...:eek:

Sberry
02-17-2007, 09:06 AM
Yup. The NEMA 14-30 configuration is called "3-wire grounding", which mean it lands an equipment ground (green), a neutral, and two hots.

In older generators, neutral and ground were bonded on the generator, but the new versions have a "floating" neutral. No bond. That's important to remember if you want to use your generator for emergency power to your house! Make sure to take the two hots and the neutral! If you don't, there will be no neutral reference for your 120V circuits, and much stuff will let the smoke out.

It would be kind of you not to ask how I know this......:o

Hank
I know that the hard way too, did it a while back at my Dads house, had to repair a bunch of stuff. I had one of my men wire up a genset for equipment and I told them to do it that way, then without thinking I hooked it up in an outage. Fixxed things for a week.

Dodgepu360
02-17-2007, 09:37 AM
ok I get it now I had the cord ends opposite