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View Full Version : Need Source: Hinges for sloping driveway gate



MAC702
09-07-2006, 01:21 AM
I know I've seen some on gates before, but not often. I've a friend with a driveway gate that needs to hinge toward the inside, but the driveway slopes upward, so either the gate has too large a gap under it, or hits the driveway shortly after starting to open.

I've seen some sort of offset hinges that cause the gate to cant upwards as it opens. I think the times I've seen this were just to make the gate self-closing, but it seems like it would solve this problem as well.

I know I could just design these myself and build them, but if there are some already out there, it might be worth it just to buy them. My local supplier doesn't have anything like them, and I just looked through the hardware section of King's Architectural with no luck.

M Squared
09-07-2006, 01:35 AM
Just offset the pivot points and allow for the angle that follows in the pins. Should be a piece of cake to get the same angle as the driveway. To get the pins oriented correctly, just use a straight edge between the holes.

MAC702
09-07-2006, 01:44 AM
Yeah, if I build them myself, I'll add a piece to the bottom hinge to move it away from the axis of the gate by the appropriate amount. That way the gate stays plumb when closed.

I'm just looking to see if anyone sells a pre-made one.

wroughtnharv
09-07-2006, 05:44 AM
What I use for offset hinges are heim joints, also called rod end bearings. They allow the movement necessary for the hinge to work effectively without having a bunch of slop in the action.

How heavy is the gate?

Pile Buck
09-07-2006, 10:13 AM
Id be very interested in seeing something like this too MAC. Only thing I can think of is using a piece of pipe, cutting it at an angle. Assemble them when the gate is closed, the pipe is in its original position. As you push / pull on the gate one piece of the pipe will climb up the other. Then have a pin down through both pieces of pipe. Question is, can you put enough angle of the pipe, so the gate will climb / raise high enough? Another question, how much force would it take to open the gate? Would you have to build a push bumper for your car to open the gate?:D


I sure could have used some hinges like this when I built this gate for my parents. It took my mom sometime to learn not to pull right up on the gate before pushing the button to open the gate. :rolleyes: :)

MAC702
09-07-2006, 10:13 AM
How heavy is the gate?

Good question. Not very heavy. There are two leaves, each about 7 feet long, 4 feet high, made from square steel tubing. And I know the guy that made them (not me) was doing it as cheaply as he could, so I expect they are pretty light.

JD in SoCal
09-07-2006, 11:30 AM
I know I've seen some on gates before, but not often. I've a friend with a driveway gate that needs to hinge toward the inside, but the driveway slopes upward, so either the gate has too large a gap under it, or hits the driveway shortly after starting to open.
Mac,

I don't have the answer for you, but I'm betting that Cary will. Give him a few minutes to get back from driving his golf cart around the strawberries. He'll have a way to make these hinges out of an old ball point pen, a skateboard wheel, and 2 sticks of chewing gum. It'll cost $.12 and work great.


JD

Hotfoot
09-07-2006, 11:48 AM
Wel 'em together, put down alevel "U" track, mount some rollers and top guides...."Sliding Gate!" (much easier to rig an opener to).:)

MAC702
09-07-2006, 01:49 PM
Wel 'em together, put down alevel "U" track, mount some rollers and top guides...."Sliding Gate!" (much easier to rig an opener to).:)
I've done that before!

Broccoli1
09-07-2006, 01:56 PM
mac,

I thought I saw some in Kings catalog as I was looking for other stuff. I'll see if I can find the Model #

Broccoli1
09-07-2006, 02:15 PM
#39-swg-606 2000lbs:D

Uphill Swing Hinge 127.50 a pair:eek:

Page #369


or

http://www.kingmetals.com/default.aspx?page=item%20detail&itemcode=39-SWG-606

MAC702
09-07-2006, 02:20 PM
http://www.kingmetals.com/default.aspx?page=item%20detail&itemcode=39-SWG-606
Looking at the picture, I don't see how they would do the job or why they would be labeled "uphill swing."

usmcpop
09-07-2006, 02:39 PM
http://www.gate-opener.com/antech_UpHill.html

http://www.gatedepot.com/diagrams/uphill_hinge.htm and http://www.gatedepot.com/prod_hardware/broc/hinge_uphill_1.html
http://www.gatedepot.com/sales_hardware_swing.html

This shows a picture of how those plain looking hinges are mounted to accommodate the uphill swing. Looks easy to duplicate with low cost materials. http://www.gatedepot.com/prod_hardware/broc/hinge_uphill_hd.htm

MAC702
09-07-2006, 02:43 PM
This shows a picture of how those plain looking hinges are mounted to accommodate the uphill swing. Looks easy to duplicate with low cost materials. http://www.gatedepot.com/prod_hardware/broc/hinge_uphill_hd.htm

Ah, I see now, and that is exactly what I was picturing doing myself anyway! Now, I see more easily a way to do it. Exactly what I needed. Thanks for the brainstorm session!

whateg0
09-07-2006, 04:11 PM
Glad you found what you needed Mac. Looking at the prices of those hinges, I am thinking I'm in the wrong business. What are they making those out of - platinum???

Dave

wroughtnharv
09-07-2006, 06:03 PM
I've been making and using gravity hinges for years. They beat the heck out of your springs for closing gates like around swimming pools etc.

In certain situations on horse ranches I use gravity to help keep a gate closed.

A gravity hinge is basically an uphill hinge. What you do is have the gate open up and out instead of just out. More than once I've had a fence around a pool red tagged because the inspector looked at the gate and didn't see a spring to make it close. The rules say "self closing" not "spring closed".

I was on one job when the inspector came by for the final. He told me the gate didn't have a spring on it. I pointed out the rule. He walked over to the gate and opened it. It closed. He opened it again. It closed, again. He probably did it ten times all the while looking to see what made it closed.

The easy way to do your drive gate since they're not too heavy is to make your top hinge the load bearing one. I'd use a J Bolt for the pin with a half inch plate drilled just a little over pin size for the bearing surface.

The reason gravity hinges aren't popular isn't because they don't work well. They work better than anything else. Gravity is one thing you can depend upon. They're difficult to get a handle on for most folks. So the reason they're not popular is because any idiot can't do it.:D

I'd hang the gate by the top hinge. Then I'd open it to see the minimum rise required. Keep in mind the higher the lift the more pressure there is to close and more difficult to open. So you want as small amount of lift as possible, keep it simple.

You'll be surprised how little movement your really need to get the rise you need.

What you're looking for when you have the gate in the open position is how far off of center line with the top hinge your pivot point will be. Again, a little goes a long way.

Let's say the pivot point it a half of an inch. That's a lot of lift at seven feet btw.

Again, using a j bolt I'd put in a vise or use a bender and bend the bolt side so that the pin goes out of line one half of an inch. On the female side of the hinge I'd again use a piece of plate and with my slightly over drilled hole. I'd cut it at an angle so the hole would match the pin while the gate is plumb up and down.

The reason for the oversize hole is to allow the misalignment caused by the offset of the hinge points. That's where the heim joint-rod end bearings are so wonderful. You get that smooth Mercedes car door action, love it.

There are two drawbacks with offset hinges. One of course is the gate always closes. And the more the offset the more violently the gate closes, heavy gates can hurt humans and damage anything caught in the way. The other drawback is they work great opening in one direction but are limited in opening the other direction. The greater the offset, the more limited the opposite swing.

Since your gates are light and small you can have a good set of well working gravity hinges for less than ten bucks based upon 5/8 by six inch J bolts available at your local fence supply and using some scrap steel you surely have around the place.

Good luck.

whateg0
09-07-2006, 08:41 PM
The other drawback is they work great opening in one direction but are limited in opening the other direction. The greater the offset, the more limited the opposite swing.

This is true if you offset the hinge pins in one direction. If you offset the hinge pins along the plane that the gate is in when it is closed, the gate will want to close either way.

http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l220/whateg01/gate.jpg

Dave

wroughtnharv
09-07-2006, 09:17 PM
This is true if you offset the hinge pins in one direction. If you offset the hinge pins along the plane that the gate is in when it is closed, the gate will want to close either way.

http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l220/whateg01/gate.jpg

Dave

Hmmmm, there's only one hinge that I know of that does that. And it involves two pins and two slots to receive those pins. It's a self closing gate hing for chain link fence applications, been around forever.

I would love to see a picture of what you're describing. Your drawing doesn't describe it accurately yet.

Masher Mfg
09-08-2006, 10:32 AM
For a heavy gate with gravity hinges, how about a guide wheel that rolls along the ground to help lift the gate? If the ground is lumpy a spring to give the wheel some vertical action might help too.

To prevent the gate from closing too rapidly, try a car shock or strut. These are generally designed to compress easily and extend slowly. They are not designed to work in the horizontal position ( internal air mixing with the fluid ) but for the application they will be fine.

The top roll weld can be cut off with a hacksaw, then all but one compression valve discs removed to reduce compression pressure even more.

MAC702
09-08-2006, 12:37 PM
Those may be ideas for somebody else, but not only do I never do wheels, this is a light gate, and the hinges in my application are to clear the driveway, not for gravity closing purposes. But good ideas for the thread, thanks.

EBFARMER
09-08-2006, 04:57 PM
Hey thanks guys, I have been trying to get my mind around this concept lately and this thread was just what I needed. My application is different however. I am looking at converting a tobacco setter into a field sprayer and this is the action that I was toying with for the booms. It allows the booms to tilt up and forward in the transport position and also allows them to rest in a sort of valley when in use. :)