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Teeps
04-05-2006, 09:52 AM
Thanks in advance for any insight....
Short story: (Questions)

Are you guys using straight solvent? or a mix?

Where are you getting solvent and for what price?
Does it last a good while for the hobbyist?

Any insight on the solvent I've picked up? (see below)

Long story:
I never thought this would be such a pain in the arse......

Bought a 20 gallon parts washer locally for $69.00 (HF)

It comes with an electric motor, and a flexible sprayer wand, and advises not to use flamable fluid for a parts cleaning solvent. I'll be cleaning engine parts, and alot of rear end parts, and cases in it.(IRS pumpkin cases).
So this thing calls for 17-19 gallons of solvent.

Finding solvent seems to be a pain in the arse, I did a search on this board, and it seems that everybody likes to use mineral spirits, and something more agressive might be a bad idea.... I also read of people getting it for $2-3 a gallon.

So now I'm pi$$ed.


I went to like every retail store on earth, and all they have is Mineral Spirits by the gallon, and its not cheap, like $7.79 +/- per gallon. Sheezus, 17 of those??!!!!!

So after going to ACE,HD, Lowes, Wallyworld, etc, I gave up, I called the old local paint supply house (Mercury Paints) actually a Sherwin Williams paint dealer.

So they have 5 gallon metal containers of Mineral Spirits, and they lowered the price to 5.79 per gallon.. about $122 out the door for 20 gallons.
This is roughly two bux better than anybody else. I'm sure if I spent another 4 hours on the phone calling chemical supply, and other paint supply places I might have found a better price but I had already spent too much phone time, and gas (after being mislead over the phone and driving to big box stores), so I was biting the bullet.

So now I get the stuff home, and read the lable a little closer, and it says flammable, and certainly doesn't say "sent free" or "low odor" on the barrels.

So now I'm wondering if I can even use this stuff, ie, if my parts washer is going to turn into a big molotoff ****tail, or if this stuff is going to stink up the whole garage.

I'll probably call sherwin willims with the part number to see what they say, overall this is been too much of a project just for parts washing solvent! Ugg.

I never thought it would cost $200.00 to get this up and running. Somebody mentioned an add for a parts washer for $125 with solvent included, I'd be jumping all over that!

Any suggestions? I don't have a TSC near me, otherwise I probably would have bought some Hi-flash from them (kind of pricey though).

I need to find out the flash point of this stuff, and wether the odor is going to peal the paint off the cars in the garage. If it turns out to be acceptable odor, and flash point I may just use this stuff, hopefully it will last a long time if I do use it. Not looking forward to hunting for the right stuff, and spending soo much coin on solvent....

Are you guys using straight solvent or a mix?

Thanks in advance...

Zrexxer
04-05-2006, 10:05 AM
HF issues the "no flammable solvents" warning to try and cover their posteriors from liability. Most parts washers in use today are filled with flammable solvents, under the names "Varsol" or "Stoddard Solvent." If you look at the chemical formulas for those two solvents, you'll find that they're similar if not identical to common "mineral spirits" which is what is sold as generic paint thinner. Flashpoints are very close and the chemical formulas are just different isomers.

The best thing you can do to keep your solvent working as long as you can (and your pump too) is to clean the solids out of the tank periodically. They'll settle down into a sludge on the bottom, I siphon the clear solvent off the top of the sludge, clean out the reservoir, then pour the (relatively) clear solvent back in.

If it makes you feel any better, it would have cost you the same for solvent whether you bought a $69 washer or a $600 washer...

Teeps
04-05-2006, 05:08 PM
http://www.setonresourcecenter.com/dtSearch/dtisapi6.dll?cmd=getdoc&DocId=18567&Index=D%3a%5cIndex%5cmsds%5fdocs&HitCount=1&hits=50+&SearchForm=D%3a%5ccrc%5cmsdss%5ccomply%2ehtm

Well based on the MSDS it looks as though the Flash point is 105 deg. F.

Doesn't seem to safe to me....

Maybe this is standard warnings.... scary....

Route of Entry: Skin YES
Route of Entry: Ingestion YES
Route of Entry: Inhalation YES
Health Hazards - Acute and Chronic OVEREXPOSURE MAY CAUSE NERVOUS SYSTEM DEPRESSION, UNCONSCIOUSNESS AND POSSIBLY DEATH. PROLONGED OVEREXPOSURE TO SOLVENT INGREDIENTS MAY CAUSE ADVERSE EFFECTS TO LIVER, URINARY SYSTEMS. MAY CAUSE PERMANENT BRAIN/NERVOUS SYSTEM DAMAGE.
Carcinogenity: NTP NO
Carcinogenity: IARC NO
Carcinogenity: OSHA NO
Explanation of Carcinogenity NONE
Symptoms of Overexposure EYES/SKIN: IRRITATION; REDNESS, ITCHING, BURNING INHALE: HEADACHE, DIZZINESS, NAUSEA, LOSS OF COORDINATION. IRRITATION OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
Medical Cond. Aggrevated by Exposure NONE RECOGNIZED
Emergency/First Aid Procedures INHALE: REMOVE FROM EXPOSURE. RESTORE BREATHING. KEEP WARM AND QUIET. SKIN: WASH EFFECTED AREA W/SOAP AND WATER. EYES: FLUSH W/LARGE AMTS OF WATER FOR 15 MIN. GET MEDICAL ATTN. INGEST: *DO NOT* INDUCE VOMITING. GIVE SEVERAL GLASSES OF WATER. SEEK MEDICAL ATTN. NEVER GIVE ANYTHING TO UNCONSCIOUS PERSON

I guess if people use deisel fuel, I guess I can use this stuff, heh.

Thanks for the insight..... any other input?

fatfrank
04-05-2006, 05:59 PM
I always thought my grandfather used NAPTHA? in his parts washer

Clay Walters
04-05-2006, 08:57 PM
If I had a parts washer I think I'd use kerosene. This article may help you decide: http://www.ci.pasadena.ca.us/Fire/flammsub.asp

Good luck,

Clay

Mike W
04-05-2006, 09:12 PM
I have used mineral spirits. I recently used some Purple Power to clean old crud on my lathe. I noticed that it did a much better job than wiping with mineral spirits. I am considering using it in the parts washer. The last time I bought mineral spirits, it was around $2.00 a gallon a few months ago.

BillDaCatt
04-05-2006, 09:36 PM
You should be able to pick it up from most any auto parts store. (kinda obvious but no-one said it yet.)
I bought 5 gallons a few weeks ago at a farm store here for $29.00. That would work out to $116.00 for 20 gallons. Still not great, but better than mineral spirits.

jjh59
04-06-2006, 06:40 AM
teeps, buy it from a fuel distributor.i work for one and we sell it in bulk and in 55 gallon drums for about $2.00 a gallon

Sberry
04-06-2006, 09:15 AM
I am sure it went up and I used the last of my stock which I paid 2 a gal for by the gallon on sale . It was as cheap to catch it that way as it was by the barrel and a lot easier to handle. For home hobby the solvent will last a long time with a bit of care and keeping the lid closed. And if your stuff wasnt just filthy you wouldnt need 20 gallons, probably get by on 12 or so.

Greenbuggy
04-06-2006, 09:49 PM
I use simple green in mine, I mix 1:3 with water, local hardware store sells simple green concentrate for $8/gallon, in a 20 gallon system you'd be looking at $40 + water, seems to work pretty well.

JP-Fab
04-08-2006, 02:11 AM
I use the purple stuff. about 5,00 + water for a 20 gal tank I mix it 10 to one. with the pump and a brush i am happy but you have to skim it every so often.

1nice70
04-08-2006, 08:13 AM
I have used mineral spirits. I recently used some Purple Power to clean old crud on my lathe. I noticed that it did a much better job than wiping with mineral spirits. I am considering using it in the parts washer. The last time I bought mineral spirits, it was around $2.00 a gallon a few months ago.

I used the PP myself in the homemade cleaner I made. Works well and is cheap.

bjfab
04-08-2006, 09:01 AM
If you are using solvent add a little water with it in a tank. About two quarts with 5 gallons will help keep the grease and sludge from cleaning parts to stay at the bottom of the tank.

Byron

BoostAddiction
04-12-2006, 02:36 PM
I use a product called Blue Gold. See the details at: [/URL][url]http://www.bluegoldcleaners.com/cleaner.htm (http://www.bluegoldcleaners.com/cleaner.htm)

It's great stuff, doesn't smell like Varsol or a petroleum product, and can be used in a wide variety of places for general cleaning.

It's expensive to buy, but very concentrated and the effective use cost is moderate.

-Will

POWERSTROKE
04-14-2006, 01:03 PM
If I had a parts washer I think I'd use kerosene. This article may help you decide: http://www.ci.pasadena.ca.us/Fire/flammsub.asp

Good luck,

Clay
I built My parts washer about 10 yrs ago from some scrap steel & an old well pressure tank.... 5 gal. of kerosene and a gallon of GUNK de-greaser is all I've ever used in it. I cleaned it two years ago and probably should clean it again in another year. It only gets used "Occasionally" on weekends.

Teeps
04-16-2006, 11:00 AM
Thanks for all the advise guys. I think the purple power stuff was sold even at HD in 5 gallons containers for a cheap price.

Based on what I read I thought the deagreaser was too strong for the pump or something.... since everybody was chiming in on Mineral spirits on a few threads I pulled up in my search.

Oh well, I think I'll be set for a while on what I have, kerosene is not really an option, I'm trying to minimize fumes, but maybe the mineral spirits will be just as bad.

My wife(pregnant) is super sensitive to fumes, and she gets an instant headache for anything like diesel, gas, etc.

I thought mineral spirits was much like simple green, but I may find out differently.

MXtras
04-17-2006, 01:49 PM
Here's another idea -

I used Agitene for many, many years. It floats on water since it is solvent based, not water based, so I would dump about 5 gallons of water in the bottom of the tank, then fill with solvent. The modified drain tube went down to within an inch of the bottom and the suction tube for the pump was situated a little above the 'water line'. The water would act as a filter for the big stuff. Worked really, really well.

I also used small plastic ***** on the top of the solvent to reduce evaporation and I put an inline automotive oil filter and a sintered metal fuel filter (race car style - can't recall the name) in the feed tube to filter out the smaller stuff. I liberated a large disc magnet from a truck transmission and stuck it to the outside of the tank near the pick up tube. I sold that home-made unit about 10 years ago. It was TOO big - I could fit an assembled straight six in it!

Now I wash everything with either Brakleen or mineral spirits but I rarely rebuild car engines any longer. I now only work on my bikes and you can pretty much get away with a pie tin and a can of Brakleen!

Scott