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hoffman
09-18-2005, 06:06 PM
I've never seen one in real life so this is what I came up with. It's still not finished but the main stuff is done.
http://images.andale.com/f2/129/111/8188590/1125714258212_cool1.jpg

tigman
09-18-2005, 06:37 PM
It looks good. How many gallons per minute, what kind of pump are you using. I have most of the parts collected for mine, all I have to do is fab up the coolant resovoir.

hoffman
09-18-2005, 06:50 PM
It's a TEEL pump which pumps about 300g/h accordin to the spec sheet. They are a little on the expensive side and I wouldn't buy one at what they're asking.
I got this one for free.

jamesdart
09-27-2005, 03:26 PM
i dont have pics, but the last thing i need is some sort of tank, right now im working on a free piece of 6" pipe and 2 caps for it. the rest consists of, 2 5" (i think) computer fans mounted to a RV transmision cooler, and a hot water baseboard circulating pump. its all free. i could use a bucket for a tank, but that is bulky and tacky. lol. i will probably have to regulate the circulating pump to slow the gph down, but i think it will work. any opinions? i knew a guy that had a big tank with a big circ pump and it worked well, with no heat exchanger. what gph and psi am i looking for? also, i wanted to run a anti freeze/ water mix in it as i only have a wood stove in my garage and i dot want anything freezing, any problems with that?

MysteryMan
09-27-2005, 08:14 PM
water + electric = :eek:

be sure to run that on a GFCI circuit and you might want to go with the water tight wire nuts (or cover regular wire nuts with ET)

bswallace
09-29-2005, 01:24 AM
I've never seen one in real life so this is what I came up with. It's still not finished but the main stuff is done.


is that a heater core for a car?


i dont have pics, but the last thing i need is some sort of tank, right now im working on a free piece of 6" pipe and 2 caps for it. the rest consists of, 2 5" (i think) computer fans mounted to a RV transmision cooler, and a hot water baseboard circulating pump. its all free. i could use a bucket for a tank, but that is bulky and tacky. lol. i will probably have to regulate the circulating pump to slow the gph down, but i think it will work. any opinions? i knew a guy that had a big tank with a big circ pump and it worked well, with no heat exchanger. what gph and psi am i looking for? also, i wanted to run a anti freeze/ water mix in it as i only have a wood stove in my garage and i dot want anything freezing, any problems with that?

how about a plastic gas can for a tank? they are cheap and come in various shapes and sizes.

LarryL
09-29-2005, 10:20 AM
i dont have pics, but the last thing i need is some sort of tank, right now im working on a free piece of 6" pipe and 2 caps for it. the rest consists of, 2 5" (i think) computer fans mounted to a RV transmision cooler, and a hot water baseboard circulating pump. its all free. i could use a bucket for a tank, but that is bulky and tacky. lol. i will probably have to regulate the circulating pump to slow the gph down, but i think it will work. any opinions? i knew a guy that had a big tank with a big circ pump and it worked well, with no heat exchanger. what gph and psi am i looking for? also, i wanted to run a anti freeze/ water mix in it as i only have a wood stove in my garage and i dot want anything freezing, any problems with that?

Commercially-made welding coolers are equipped with fan-cooled radiators and small volume reservoir tanks to keep them compact. You can simplify your cooler by eliminating the radiator and fan if you use a large enough heat sink to take up the heat generated in your torch. For example, a 30 gallon plastic rubbish can filled with cold water will allow you to weld for a long time before the recirculated water gets too hot to provide sufficient cooling for your torch. I used to recirculate water through a 16 gallon metal drum on steel legs to cool my torch. It worked well even though I had an inadequate type of pump (a sump pump). If the Teel pump is a vane pump or gear pump, it will serve well as a welding cooler pump. The Procon pumps used in most commercially-made coolers are vane pumps. I stopped using my steel drum because of algae/slime problems and the need for a better pump. My Lincoln Magnum's fan, however, is noisy and I've been thinking of reverting to a simple, heat sink cooling system now that I've purchased a used Procon pump. Welding is more relaxing when you've only got to listen to the fan of your welding machine running. Having another fan blasting out decibels of noise at me tends to distract my attention from the molten bead I'm trying to lay down. The main disadvantage of using a large volume recirculating cooler is that it will take up more space than a compact, fan-equipped one. Also, it's not as mobile as a fan-equipped cooler. I would not recommend your regulating the output of a pump by reducing its speed. A better way would be to adjust the flow rate to your torch by bypassing the unneeded amount of water back into your reservoir tank A simple tee and a couple of small valves should accomplish that. My Lincoln cooler has an output of about 0.8 liters per minute. I believe that this is at a pressure of around 50 psi. Coolant reservoir tanks are best made out of metal because they will conduct built up heat to the air outside of them faster than will plastic tanks. This quicker heat conduction and more rapid convection and radiation transfers to the surrounding air increases the cooling capabilities of your cooler.

LarryL

jamesdart
09-29-2005, 03:12 PM
yeah, my reasone for adding the heat exchanger is that i dont want to be toting around too many gallons. im going to try to stay small, around 3 gallons. i am confident in the fans and cooler, i just dont know if the pump will move the water too fast or too high of a preasure. trial and error i guess. i really want to try it out already.