PDA

View Full Version : Sherwin Williams Direct to Metal Paint



willwill
03-03-2005, 11:52 AM
Has anyone tried Sherwin Williams' "Direct to Metal" paint? The customer rep said primer isn't needed so it should be pretty easy to apply. Since I have a 33% Sherwin William coupon for this weekend, I thought I might give it a try.

Thanks
Jim

Mike W
03-03-2005, 12:13 PM
I once saw a new truck service body painted with direct to metal paint, don't know the paint brand. In a short time it was coming off in big sheets. :eek: I made a mental note to always use primer. :rolleyes:

Sberry
03-03-2005, 12:40 PM
For stuff left indoors it isnt going to be as critical as outdoor. Paint life is about surface prep, etch, the right one and quality of paints. Primer is no big deal for me, its getting it to that point that is all the work. I sandblast a lot of things, then scotch brite before epoxy primer and Imron topcoats if it is going outdoor. Indoor I will use anything I have as its just mostly for color. Indoor where chalking isnt a concern Sometimes I dont prime but use Dupont 34P alk enamal, its fast dry and colors well in one coat. Most of these would be difficult for the novice painter though as the different thinners and hardners are many and expensive and inventory can run up costs. Try to find something you like and stick with it, same kind of thinner, etc.

diesel
03-03-2005, 01:10 PM
Like soooo many things its all about the prep. I like to sandblast then let it rust a little then put on this (http://www.gemplers.com/a/shop/product.asp?T1=RCG&UID=200503031304407814386531) then paint. Finish sucks but it is bulletproof. BTW the link is to Gemplers rust converter.
d.

enlpck
03-03-2005, 01:13 PM
Has anyone tried Sherwin Williams' "Direct to Metal" paint? The customer rep said primer isn't needed so it should be pretty easy to apply. Since I have a 33% Sherwin William coupon for this weekend, I thought I might give it a try.

Thanks
Jim

If the paint is going to see weather, prep and prime. The direct-to-metal (self priming is one term) paints need the same prep as a primer, and they don't hold up real well without primer.

I feel like a bum for a paint job I'm doing right now on a machine cab. Don't have the time to tear it down, so the interior is only getting degreased, scratch brushed, scotch brite, tack, and spirit wipe before the new color coat. It SHOULD be chipped and stripped, but that is about a month of teardown, and the same to rebuild (plumbing, air lines, lots and lots of wiring, glass, etc) so what holds up to the above prep will hold a fresh color coat adequately for several years. Only priming where the old had chipped off.

metals406
03-03-2005, 01:19 PM
I was shown this product put on a piece of plain glass. It's supposed to be a one-coat system. I tried to scrape it off of the glass, and had no luck. It reminded me of the wear characteristics of powder coat. I would get mine from Saverud, but you can check it out here, http://corporate.ppg.com/ppg/paf/documents/pitttech.pdf

Saverud Paint Shop
315 1st Avenue East
Kalispell, MT 59901
USA
Tel: (406) 755-6699
E-mail: kbolstad@netrix.net

Nate

willwill
03-03-2005, 01:20 PM
Thnaks for the input everyone. I didn't even think about whether thinners and hardeners would be required with this paint. Are they required with most industrial paint?

The Sherwin Williams paint is supposed to be a brand new technology (per the web site) and after discounts would be less than $40 per gallon.

Thanks again!


For stuff left indoors it isnt going to be as critical as outdoor. Paint life is about surface prep, etch, the right one and quality of paints. Primer is no big deal for me, its getting it to that point that is all the work. I sandblast a lot of things, then scotch brite before epoxy primer and Imron topcoats if it is going outdoor. Indoor I will use anything I have as its just mostly for color. Indoor where chalking isnt a concern Sometimes I dont prime but use Dupont 34P alk enamal, its fast dry and colors well in one coat. Most of these would be difficult for the novice painter though as the different thinners and hardners are many and expensive and inventory can run up costs. Try to find something you like and stick with it, same kind of thinner, etc.

Mike W
03-03-2005, 01:26 PM
I use Sherwin Williams oil base industrial paint. You can brush it right out of the can but I have to thin it a little to spray it.

willwill
03-03-2005, 01:29 PM
Thnaks Mike, for answering the question. The price is tempting but as everyone has said, the paint may not last in the long run.




I use Sherwin Williams oil base industrial paint. You can brush it right out of the can but I have to thin it a little to spray it.

Mike W
03-03-2005, 01:58 PM
This was the regular paint that needs a primer. I painted some rusty fence poles made from pipe. I just gave them a quick power brush job. This was years ago. They still look like new, kind of surprised me. :D

willwill
03-03-2005, 02:16 PM
If only I could be so lucky. :) I'm painting an entry gate that been rusting a little. Do you think I should sandblast the entire gate (about 15') or just sand the rusted areas clean)?



This was the regular paint that needs a primer. I painted some rusty fence poles made from pipe. I just gave them a quick power brush job. This was years ago. They still look like new, kind of surprised me. :D

Mike W
03-03-2005, 02:34 PM
I would probably just clean up the rusty places. Jasco metal prep does a good job on rust. I think the key is getting an adequate paint film to get a job to last. A thin coat from a rattle can never seems to hold up.

diesel
03-03-2005, 02:35 PM
Will, the gemplers rust converter needs rust to bond. I do use it over unpreped stuff. Pressure wash and then knock off the worst of the scale by hand with a wire brush.If you do go through with a sand blast then prime and paint.
d.

Ray C.
03-03-2005, 04:54 PM
Has anybody tried Benjaman Moore Iron Clad?
The guy at the paint store swore by it.

cross6
03-03-2005, 05:36 PM
A few thick coats of Rustoleum "Paint over rust" for $6 a quart at walmart has never failed me

enlpck
03-03-2005, 08:03 PM
Has anybody tried Benjaman Moore Iron Clad?
The guy at the paint store swore by it.

The Ironclad Alkyd? yup. Good paint. Never used any of the other Ironclad branded. Brushes well, sets well, holds up prety good with good prep. Loosens around high heat. (near steam lines, near a coal stove, no problem around an engine compartment) Chips and peels if the prep isn't done adequitely, especially over old paint or bare metal.

The Impervo Urethane alkyd is supposed to be really tough. I've used it a few times, but haven't had enough time to see how it holds up. Real draggy to brush, though, and would need to be cut to spray it.

willwill
03-03-2005, 08:10 PM
Thanks Mike, sounds like a plan. I thought about the rattle can but knew it would only hold up for a year if I was lucky.


I would probably just clean up the rusty places. Jasco metal prep does a good job on rust. I think the key is getting an adequate paint film to get a job to last. A thin coat from a rattle can never seems to hold up.

diesel

The pressure washer sounds like a great idea. I hadn't thought about it. When I painted my house it did a good job of peeling loose paint - it may do the same on the gate with enough pressure. I was using a wire wheel on a drill but maybe just a wire brush after the pressure washer might be all I need.

By the way, here's a link to the Sherwin Williams coupon - if you use your Discover card you get an additional 5% off (need to sign up for the discount on the Discover site).

http://tool.optiem.com/d/d.aspx?f=sher1047.htm


Thanks again!